Tag Archives: #sewing

V.I.P.

Most people will have heard of the male name Viggo. At least when paired with the surname Mortensen. He said in an interview that the name Viggo is considered somewhat dorky in his Dad’s native Denmark. The surname is just plain fairly common as are most surnames ending in -sen.

It seems the name Viggo is on the rise in popularity though. One of “my” cub scouts bears it and I recently found out my sister likes it. The reason for my discoveryis that her daughter, my niece, is pregnant, and my sister suggested the name.

An ultrasound showed that she’s carrying a girl. The name does however have a female counterpart: Vigga.

And that’s what I call this pattern:

vigga

I’m not done with it – it’s going to be a baby blanket. Right now it’s VIP. Vigga In Progress.

And the colour scheme? Her due date is the fifth of November, known to any Brit as bonfire day to commemorate the discovery of the gunpowder plot led by Guy Fawkes before they had time to blow up the Parliament and upheave alle order in the UK. Hence the red, orange and yellows.

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Think pink!

pink skuldertaske for

pink skuldertaske bag

My darling mum was always a collector and saver. I inherited and willingly pick up anything she began to discard because of a move to a smaller flat. I fully intend to turn the odds and ends into something, and this shoulder bag is one such thing.

I have no clue what she intended the two different kinds of material for. Probably something else. Only thing I’m sure about is the strap surprised her.

It’s an old bicycle tube.

The top is something shiny, the beads are mostly Czech glass, the floral-print is satin.

There’s something about contrasts …

 

CDM

Cake, dinner, midnight.

Calculation, dedication, mass production

Chaos, disaster, moping

What have I been doing?! Well you might just ask. The answer is that Saturday my Mum came to visit to see the progress on her bedspread (see last post) and decide what should go on it now. We talked back and forth for a bit, thought a lot and finally decided to reduce the number of denim pieces and add a simple patchwork design of only squares.

A lot of them as it turned out. 468 to be precise.

We sighed a bit, then she began to cut out the squares, I began to edge them, and my daughter collected them in bundles of 10 to ease counting. All was well, we took a break for coffee / tea and cakes, another break later on to finish cooking a pot roast already simmering.

Time wore on but around 11 PM we “just” needed 80-odd squares and went on cutting to get it over with.

Minutes later disaster struck. My trusty old sewing machine decided to play up, eat material and make snares of the thread. 44 squares are un-edged, and all of them still need sewing together.

I really need the one CDM I didn’t have: Cadbury’s dairy milk.

Bead it, bag it

rodviolet-taske-2

So here’s the reason I was silent online for a fortnight and a day: I kept myself busy making this little trifle. Which is less of a trifle given the fact that I started out with flat material, a lenght of cord, a needle, thread and two boxes of Czech glass beads. Yup, that’s right: Each and every single one of the beads on this bag is sewn on by hand.

I’m rather pleased with the result, I have to admit. I wanted it to look random in it’s pattern, and I followed a meandering trail traced in tailor’s chalk before I began beading.

That’s not saying I didn’t beat myself on the head a few times in the process. What was I thinking using the really small beads and tracing such a long trail? And did they really all need two stitches to fasten them securely?

The answer is I was thinking how it would end up looking. And I like it. It was worth it.

http://www.amioamio.com/da/produkt/167009/

Careful

This post will have you seeing stars. Really.

I was seeing stars when I got the material for the shorts I practically finished. It was in a shop in Amsterdam, our summer hols destination, and it was just packed with fabrics I wanted. And I had to limit myself and therefore pinched close my eyes so hard it made stars shimmer inside the lids.

My daughter saw stars too, but only these.

Then I was seeing stars again when I laid out the pattern. This time they were stars of rage. What was she thinking in that shop?! I specifically asked for enough for a pair of semi-long shorts. And this is how they had to look in the end:

stjerneshorts

All I could get were the leg parts. Not the waist band, not the pockets, not the belt straps. And I really was very careful, trying several times over to somehow fit more pieces onto the star fabric.

So I was reminded again to be careful about trusting shop clerks. At least my daughter thinks her new shorts are cool.

 

Strip and strap on

Got anyone’s curiousity up? Got anything else up?

Well, sorry. No explicit content despite the hints. Just some explanatory content:

As may be discernible this is the top par of a pair of (short) pants and five strips of material before they went on those shorts as belt straps.

The shorts belong to my eldest daughter. The one wearing a fault patterned sweater in an earlier post. She likes colours, which is lucky for me because I made a blunder cutting these shorts, laying the pattern pieces the wrong way on the material. Which meant there was too little and I had to add on. The turqouise was left over from sewing another pair of pants and was okayed by her.

The irony is that I could have done without those gussets. Because skinny as she is the shorts proved a bit too big for her. Since her belt was apt at slipping she asked for straps.

I dug out pink-and-white scraps as well as turqouise. Colour-loving that she is she went for the latter. And I got the joint pleasures of using up a long strip and improving her shorts.

Now if we could just get the heat of summer back, everything would be good.

The Seventh year stitch(es)

Yes I know full well I’ve been at it before. And now I’m at it again: Scouting. Well it’s just a sign that it takes up a lot of mental room. Hardly surprising since I have this proof of just how long time ago I first donned my blue uniform:

årsstjerne

7 years in blue. And ridiculously proud to show it. As a girl I was in the YWCA for 6 years. And no that doesn’t mean I should have a star saying 13 years on my pocket, which is where it’s sewn on. Because I’m in the non-denominational uni-sex Danish Scout Corps now.

And I think I’m ready for seven more years, one at a time. So is it much of a craft to sew on a small piece of material? Not really, though our uniforms are made of sturdy cotton woven the same way as denim.

What is a genuine craft is coming up with idea upon idea on how to train each girl and boy scouting skills, cooperation, cameraderie, how to overcome being homesick, pitching tents et c. And still keep up your own enthusiasm. OIt’s only possible because scouting is so wonderful it attracts other adults that become friends. Oh yes, I am SO ready for seven more years. Itching to get back to it all!