Category Archives: Nerd

Big frustrations

While it’s all well and good that someone wants to sell my patterns it also means that I have to make cut-out-sheets with all the different parts. Which is far from easy. And all the while my neighbours’ moronic son plays extremely loud, extremely rotten “music” going right throuh two walls, a hedge and several yars of garden.

I tried the Brian Wilson-cure. No good. Instead of Good Vibrations it was more like

“(I’m picking up): I’m seeing these big frustrations / it’s being exasperating” – repeat ad nauseam.

Only when I pain-stakingly made grid after grid in the different sizes of some of the parts did it help. In part. Because I obviously can’t get two grid next to each other in spite of ample room. And I can’t draw up all the parts because a grid does not allow for a diagonal line.

It seems it’s back to hand-drawing, scanning and clip-art. A hassle, in other words.

Oh yes and of course I just got a rejection from one of the two still possible publishers. I see more grids looming.

Perhaps I should just call up the other publisher, ask him straight out and then start selling those patterns individually.

Some of them are actually easy to draw up. And an opening in one shop could be openings in other shops too.

And once those pattern pieces are made I just need to store them safely. Yup, I could be cathing a few Good Vibrations too.

Advertisements

Snip, snip

Do you know the feeling? You found all your patchwork material, spread it over half the living room and cut piece after piece for a specific project.

Then the minute you sigh and begin to re-fold everything to put it away you think of other patterns. Leave the mess, take up pencil and paper – in my case a standard checkered pad – and begin to draw. Come up with brilliant ideas. Or remember old and equally brilliant ideas not yet put into colours and cloth.

Lean back with sketches on the pad, smile to yourself and fetch the thick paper used for clich´s and begin to cut those. And then finally go on to cut the material for those patterns.

That’s what I did this past week. Well, not all of it, some of it. And now that I finally put all the material away to stop myself getting further ideas I have not only the 468 pieces for my Mum’s bedspread but also 2X5 for two canters, 15 pieces for one experimental pattern, 11 pieces for another experiment and finally 177 pieces for a square pattern. Because I stopped myself before I began to cut a hexagon cliche’e which would have meant countless other pieces.

Oh and did I mention I always hand-sew? Seems I have my work cut out for me very literally.

Five to the longest second

5 i anden

This has taken me forever to finish. It’s spent a lot of time lying idle, but even in efficient time I spent hours on it. Because everything is hand-sewn.

It’s also a bit of math. Within the same size square i patched 1X1, 2X2, 3X3, 4X4 and finally 5X5. That’s a LOT of patches; the corners alone consist of 100 tiny patches in all.

Taht said I really like the effect. It could be expanded to xXx given sufficient patience, nerdery and of course material. The one thing to calculate is the fact that it grows fast.

Just one more would necessitate larger squares – the smallest patches are just 1X1 cm; really small – plus two more squares on each side. The number of patches more or less expplodes when going up just a single size.

I could still imagine this pattern turned into a bed spread. It would be time to learn to patch on machine, I think.

This is my daughter’s fault

Now before any possible reader’s hackles are raised, this is neither naming, blaming or shaming. Instead I’m straightly, strictly literal:

Nannas forkastning

The dear girl studies geology and saw on one field trip a fellow student wearing a sweater that inspired her. Could I knit a pattern with stripes that are interrupted in a slanted line?

My answer yes prompted a sketch that’s turning into the above: A clourful rendition of a fault line. The blue, yellow and red layers of sediment, as it were, on the black background cut up and unjoined with the forces of the earth’s tectonic plates.

Or in this case, the force of my knitting needles. Don’t you just love a nerd like that?! I do.